immunotherapy for the win!

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11457213

great success

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Why the causes of cancer are more than just random ‘bad luck’

http://theconversation.com/why-the-causes-of-cancer-are-more-than-just-random-bad-luck-36250

I’m really enjoying the conversations from different scientists that go on around this topic. It’s got the right level of contention.

Sometimes one can agree with both parties based on both their very well based research.

It substantiates the ‘I just don’t know anymore’ comment.

Contributions to cancer

Last night, I was struggling to sleep because of the amount of information, the amount of research, that goes into studying cancer. It’s quite disconcerting. It’s also a bit chicken and egg really.

Perhaps at the moment I’m coming to terms with the lack of linearity in the subject. There is so much to do. There is so much unknown.

I tried to articulate what goes into cancer in the form of a mind map. I also wanted to consider a few poignant questions to contribute toward some sort of one-to-two-dimensional linearity that I am comfortable with.

Cancer is a multi-dimensional disease. However, so as to not overwhelm myself and any other layperson, I thought we could build our understanding from bottom up… I haven’t quite worked out how yet.

understanding cancer

Cancer research

What I’ve learned from observing the works of a cancer researcher is that very seldom are discoveries made by one person. All scientists depend on the research of others. All research contributes toward the greater good.

The scientific process is non-linear. It forms a complex network. Every meeting point is a piece of research that is connected to several others. The networks themselves are layered.

At this point in time, I’m struggling to get my head around the magnitude of work that has gone into finding out more about cancer. It’s so complex. It is so complex.

I’m reminded of a song.